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Thread: tracing straight plane line with the putter?

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    Default tracing straight plane line with the putter?

    I've been missing putts to the right. I put a laser on my putter shaft and found that I'm tracing a straightline going back, but that after impact it points out to the right. The problem is that when I do trace a straight line both back and through, I pull/hook the putt pretty severely.

    Have I just learned to compensate with the blade alighnment to make up for swinging out to right field? If so, do I stick with tracing a line and just learn to "readjust" for that?

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    Senior Member Chip Putterman's Avatar
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    Tiger does a drill where he only putts with his right hand on the club. He does so to get a proper release. Try it with or without the laser. Assuming you have the laser pointed at the target and perpendicular to the blade, you should see a straight line the entire stroke.

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    Senior Member Richie3Jack's Avatar
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    I trace a plane line with my full swing, but when I tried it with my putter I just couldn't get it to work. There are some who can do it, so it may work for you. In the end, I went with more of a SBST-ish stroke. It's still got an arc to it, but a slighter one and it's worked for me for the most part.



    3JACK

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnadon View Post
    I've been missing putts to the right. I put a laser on my putter shaft and found that I'm tracing a straightline going back, but that after impact it points out to the right. The problem is that when I do trace a straight line both back and through, I pull/hook the putt pretty severely.

    Have I just learned to compensate with the blade alighnment to make up for swinging out to right field? If so, do I stick with tracing a line and just learn to "readjust" for that?

    c,
    Your problem is that you do not have a set procedure to square your blade at impact, so you are trying to keep the blade square all through the stroke..
    Unfortunately that involves rotational manupulation (forearms) which (I think) you don't need, and are presently overdoing or underdoing it ........
    Last edited by puttmad; 09-07-2009 at 08:45 AM.

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    Default The #1 Putting Problem—by far.

    Quote Originally Posted by cnadon View Post
    Have I just learned to compensate with the blade alighnment to make up for swinging out to right field? If so, do I stick with tracing a line and just learn to "readjust" for that?
    The motion you describe—pardon the pun—is the #1 mistake that golfers of all level make when putting.

    They are ON PLANE going back, and then somewhere between the change-of-directions, and impact, the club "walks" off the plane toward the hole.

    Steering.

    You need to TRACE perfectly, and have the face open enough to make the putt.

    You'll be WAY better off.
    All you have is your hand path, the force along that path, and torque about that path.


    That's your means for creating the proper D-Plane with the proper speed, for the desired shot.


    Golf Magazine Top 100 Teacher Brian Manzella's travels extensively teaching golfers and instructors, and his home base is English Turn Golf & Country Club in New Orleans, Louisiana

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    Quote Originally Posted by puttmad View Post
    c,
    Your problem is that you do not have a set procedure to square your blade at impact, so you are trying to keep the blade square all through the stroke..
    Procedure or no procedure, his clubface is CLOSED to his path, and CLOSED to his plane line.

    Quote Originally Posted by puttmad View Post
    Unfortunately that involves rotational manupulation (forearms) which (I think) you don't need, and are presently overdoing or underdoing it ........
    No forearm rotation needed to have the clubface square to the plane.

    And his MAY need to be OPEN to the plane.

    That's counter-rotation, or maybe grip adjustment.

    See?
    All you have is your hand path, the force along that path, and torque about that path.


    That's your means for creating the proper D-Plane with the proper speed, for the desired shot.


    Golf Magazine Top 100 Teacher Brian Manzella's travels extensively teaching golfers and instructors, and his home base is English Turn Golf & Country Club in New Orleans, Louisiana

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Manzella View Post
    Procedure or no procedure, his clubface is CLOSED to his path, and CLOSED to his plane line.



    No forearm rotation needed to have the clubface square to the plane.
    No dispute there Brian....

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Manzella View Post

    And his MAY need to be OPEN to the plane.

    That's counter-rotation, or maybe grip adjustment.

    See?
    Yep, understand.....what about ball position?..If he takes the ball slightly further back, that would do it also?....

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    Quote Originally Posted by puttmad View Post
    what about ball position?..If he takes the ball slightly further back, that would do it also?....
    Well, you would want it a bit PAST low point. Ideally.

    This would require an open face to make the putt, or a square one and a slightly right aim, ala Tiger.
    All you have is your hand path, the force along that path, and torque about that path.


    That's your means for creating the proper D-Plane with the proper speed, for the desired shot.


    Golf Magazine Top 100 Teacher Brian Manzella's travels extensively teaching golfers and instructors, and his home base is English Turn Golf & Country Club in New Orleans, Louisiana

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